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Writing IEP Goals

IEP Goals for Writing - With Samples

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Search IEP goals and objectives by content area. Ideas and strategies by experienced teachers to help support and enhance writing instruction at all grade levels. Content Goals The following sample IEP goals for writing are directed at improving the student's content which includes the presence, development and support of ideas. Given a writing assignment, the student will improve his content from a score of 2 Basic to a score of 3 Proficient using a district writing rubric.

With the use of a graphic organizer, the student will produce a insert anticipated number paragraph essay that includes a topic sentence, at least insert anticipated number transition words and a conclusion. Given a topic, the student will compose insert number of paragraphs required in which each will include a topic sentence, at least insert anticipated number supporting details and logical sequence. Fluency Goals Depending on the level of the student, fluency goals can be used to measure letters written, words written or words written correctly where words with spelling errors are not given credit.

Given a insert number of minutes timed writing probe, the student will increase the total number of words written correctly from current baseline number of words to anticipated number of words. Focus Goals Focus is important in writing so the student does not go off topic and confuses the reader or presents too much, or conflicting, information.

There are sample IEP Goals for written expression below. The list includes goals for many skills used in writing. For your child, you can write goals that are similarly worded.

To make good IEP Goals for written expression, add similar goals or modify these goals to create great goals for your child. He will have a main topic and three supporting points as a basis for his essay. Keep in mind, when writing, your child must hold information in his head, then process it in his working memory. Your child can learn to use fine motor skills and good planning to get his ideas into writing.

Keyboarding and handwriting are important as written expression skills as well. This came from the specialized program she was using. As students learned a skill, she would advance them down the banner. This made it easy for her to write specific reading goals. After children master math operations skills adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing , they learn how to use reasoning to solve word problems. The intended outcome might have been for Jane to solve two-part word problems.

But this goal says she needs to learn to use problem-solving strategies. The goal does not state whether she will be able to solve problems. Worse, this goal includes all math operations adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing , making the goal overly broad. It is not specific or measurable. It does not use action words, and is not realistic or time-limited.

According to Jane's IEP, using objects helps her to solve problems. A better goal for Jane might be:. Using real money, Jane will be able to show how much money she has after she receives two weeks of allowance, and how much money she will have left after she buys one object, with 75 percent accuracy measured twice weekly each quarter.

Achievement in written language requires many skills. Mechanics help make thoughts clear. Word usage and sentence structure help make the writing interesting. Good thought expression sends the desired message. Jane needs to write a paragraph, with a topic sentence and at least 4 detail sentences, on one given topic using her editing checklist measured twice monthly.

By the way it was written, the intended outcome is that Jane only "needs" to write a paragraph to meet the goal. Jane will write and edit a five-sentence paragraph that addresses a given subject twice a month.

Each paragraph will include a topic sentence, at least four details and a conclusion. She will earn a score of 75 percent or higher on a writing rubric for each writing assignment. There will be at least four writing assignments per quarter. Rubrics are useful scoring tools that measure a child's progress. A writing rubric includes the criteria and standards used to assess a child's performance on writing assignments.

The revised goal is s pecific and m easurable. It uses a ction words, is r ealistic, and t ime-limited. Ruth Heitin is a Special Education Consultant serving students with special needs and their parents — evaluating students, consulting with families and schools, and serving as an expert witness in legal proceedings.

Heitin's doctoral degree is in Special Education Administration. She has been certified as a general education teacher, special education teacher and elementary school principal. She is also a contributor to the Wrightslaw newsletter, the Special Ed Advocate , as well as authoring articles in other educational publications. Sponsored Links About these ads Consumer Tips.


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IEP goals in written expression should include individual goals in various areas including content, fluency and focus. The following sample goals for writing can be used for primary level students with needs in the area of written expression.

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Objective #3 Read/write a minimum of high freguency words. Objective #4 Use beginning, redial and ending letter cues to predict unknown words. Objective #5 Locate specific words, phrases, word patterns, and sight words in familiar text. Objective #6 Read predictable pattern books. Objective #7 Read dictated or self-written texts.

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WRITING MEASURABLE IEP GOALS. AT THIS SESSION, YOU WILL LEARN The four components of a measurable goal. Terms to use that are measurable. How to write clear goal descriptions. Writing IEP Goals By: Ruth Heitin Learn how to write Individualized Education Plan (IEP) goals that are SMART (specific, measurable, use action words, realistic, and time-limited) and based on research-based educational practice.

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An IEP goal is not unlike a personal goal. With an IEP goal, we create an educational program for a child with special needs. An IEP goal describes what we hope the child will achieve, or the intended outcome of instruction. Writing IEP Goals. by Ruth Heitin, Ph.D., Educational Consultant. Print this page. Creating an IEP with a team of people who are all there to design a good educational program for one unique child can be a pleasure.