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Fifteen Tips on Writing the WPE Essay

Elements of Writing Proficiency

❶Adequate preparation requires that you do more than skim the articles once or twice. The at-home carbonation machine company has shifted its marketing in recent months to focus more on the product's ability to make sparkling water and less on its ability to make soda.

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Preparing for the Writing Proficiency Evaluation (WPE)
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Next, give an example to support your topic sentence followed by an explanation of the importance of your evidence.

Don't assume that a five-paragraph essay is all you will need; don't let the form drive the content. Instead, use the appropriate number of paragraphs to prove adequately the position you take. Avoid long stories or descriptions. Rather, briefly use your experience to prove a point.

The use of first person I is acceptable since you are being asked to support your position. Keep your audience in mind: Focus on clarity and precision. Although humor and satire are difficult to write, humor is welcome if it serves the topic. Avoid overly satiric writing since it may take away from a focused response to the prompt. Often students think that a conclusion to a short persuasive essay needs to repeat all of the main ideas.

This strategy may be useful for long, technical reports or complicated pieces of writing. However, for short, argumentative essays, don't waste time repeating yourself, and don't insult your readers' intelligence by going over material that you've already clearly outlined. Instead, use your conclusion for an appropriate closing of your essay; it's the last part of your argument that you give your reader, so leave a good impression: Don't sum up the obvious.

Vocabulary, sentence control and sentence variety are important for a university-educated person to master. Avoid writing exclusively in primer prose, such as: I think gun control is a good idea. It is a good idea to educate people about their guns. Guns have caused lots of deaths in the U.

Congress has to do something about gun control. Note that each sentence in this example has a certain form--subject, verb, object. There is no variety or complexity in the above sentences, and your WPE essays scorers want to see some variety or complexity in your sentences. Always allow time to reread your essay. Everyone makes slips on a first draft, and you probably won't have time to recopy your essay. If you write quickly, you should have at least fifteen minutes to make sure you've used appropriate examples, that your paragraphs are in order, that your facts are accurate, etc.

Lastly, check for missing words or endings of words, serious misspellings, grammar slips, etc. Crossing out words is ok, but do try to be as neat as possible.

Superior 6 — Addresses the topic and remains highly-focused on the complexity of the issues raised in the reading passage; offers variety and sophistication in sentence structure, diction, and vocabulary, and exhibits an excellent command of written English. Strong 5 — Addresses the topic and maintains its focus on many of the issues raised in the reading passage; offers variety in sentence structure, diction, and vocabulary, and exhibits a strong command of written English.

Meets Expectations 4 — Addresses the topic, and though it may waver in its focus, it has engaged the primary issue raised in the reading passage; exhibits proficiency in written English through the use of vocabulary as expressed in coherent sentences and developed paragraphs; while the essay may contain some grammatical flaws including common ESL-related locutions , they do not detract from the overall effect or clarity of the writing.

May be a blank exam or one containing only a few sentences. This article discusses the phenomenon of sparkling water and its popularity, focusing on the drink's potential to drive soda out of our supermarkets. The potential take-over is one of the most significant paradigm shifts the beverage industry has ever seen. Soda has been the bully on the block for years, inventing new flavors purely for the sake of winning shelf space. Now, for the first time, soda consumption has declined by nearly twenty-five percent, while sparkling water consumption has gone up to balance the change.

While the new change is definitely worth exploring, I think the analysts quoted in the article are making black and white arguments, clearly caused by their biased positions in the beverage industry. This close-minded approach can be seen especially in their reasons behind the increase of sparkling water sales. They argue that the change is being caused by health concerns, the public's desire for variety, and economic factors like low income. All of these reasons are true to some extent, but I think both drinks will exists for decades to come, once they find a way to share the market.

Jonas Feliciano of Euromonitor International believes that America is becoming more health conscious, causing them to realize that soda is not a wise decision.

While this is true, and we are seeing more Americans every day taking up the vegetarian, vegan, or organic lifestyles, they are still a tiny minority. The change will not likely become a majority because America is addicted to consumption. It is part of a national mentality of excess from fast food to caffeine addiction, and no addiction is easy to kick. The world saw a similar phenomenon when cigarettes were invented. They were believed to be healthy, then proven to be lethal, and everyone thought the cigarette industry would die as a result.

Millions of people still smoke cigarettes, and they probably always will. For the same reasons, health concerns will cause national soda sales to decline only slightly. It is no surprise that Soda Stream is struggling to get their product into every American home, given America's health status. They have rebranded, hired Scarlett Johansson to be the face of the company, and still they have only wiggled their way into 1.

This is because we are one of the unhealthiest countries. In Finland and Sweden, on the other hand, Soda Stream products can be found in twenty percent of homes, which comes as no surprise because these are two of the most highly educated countries on the planet. Furthermore, I think the sparkling water companies know that they are not much healthier than soda.

Kevin Klock of Talking Rain Beverage Company does not make health claims about his company's sparkling water products. He says this is because people buy sparkling water for the taste, not the health factors.

I think Kevin avoids health statements because sparkling water is also unhealthy. The flavoring comes from sugar, just like soda. Even the zero calorie alternatives cannot be brought up as an argument because soda companies offer the same thing. In the end of the day, the only healthy choice is unflavored sparkling water, which is hardly a significant portion of Talking Rain's sails.

Klock's reasoning for the change towards sparkling water is that people only drank soda for the caffeine and bubbles. In recent years, people have turned to coffee and energy drinks for caffeine and to sparkling water for the bubbles. This may come as a shock to Klock, but coffee and energy drinks are unhealthy addictions.

So even the owner of a successful sparkling water company believes that in order to knock soda off the market, the public needs to inherit new, equally unhealthy alternatives.

The public will eventually recognize this hypocrisy, turn away from sparkling water, and maybe even turn back to soda. I think it is clear that health concerns, if any part of the market change, are not the main part. Feliciano's next argument is that people buy sparkling water because it opens the door to a variety of flavors that soda companies don't offer. He claims that most sodas come in cola or lemon-lime flavors. Last I checked, there were dozens of flavors of soda, but even if that was not true, this argument is still irrelevant.

Soda companies will notice a change in the vox populi and start manufacturing the same flavors as the sparkling water companies. Long before their shelf space is overtaken, the soda companies will find a way to capitalize on the pioneer work of the sparkling water companies. Finally, there is the issue of income. Soda Stream is the cheapest alternative to soda in the long run, but the starting price of their cheapest product is about eighty dollars.

This is not a price low-income households are willing to pay. Feliciano points out that in addition to the slight difference in production costs, soda has an advantage because of promotional deals that are rarely offered for sparkling water in supermarkets and convenience stores. Again, this is a very true statement, but it is only temporary.

If sparkling water sales continue to increase at the rates we are currently witnessing, stores will offer the same promotions for sparkling water as they do for soda. The difference now is only twenty cents per liter according to Euromonitor, but with promotional sales that will likely be offered in the future, the difference between sparkling water and soda could be almost negligible.

In the end of the day, all of these arguments hold some truth. Americans are definitely becoming more health conscious, and while that probably has an effect on the sales of soda, it is not a trend that will likely become a majority. Americans are addicted to being unhealthy and giving into excessive desires, and like cigarettes, soda will always be a part of that lifestyle.

Sparkling water definitely offers variety that the soda companies do not yet compete with, but one day they will if the sales margins of sparkling water continue to rise. Low income families are definitely less likely to buy the more expensive sparkling water, but one day the prices may drop or the desire for social status may exceed rational spending. The future of the beverage industry is not so black and white. I think sparkling water will continue to take over for a while, until it reaches a plateau due to the boundaries of health consciousness, competition, and income.

Still, if sparkling water manages to make a significant impact on the sales of soda - and industry that has been poisoning Americans for generations - then it will go down in history as one of the most significant events in the legacy of the beverage industry.

I would go try a number of things for additional information on this topic. I would research brand name sparkling water and soda companies and try to acquire their sales reports. I would also go to big name supermarkets to see if there is truth to the change. Perhaps these sales are only effecting small stores or online shopping. Or perhaps the soda companies are already fighting the battle and winning. Additionally, I would look for articles on consumer trends in other beverages in order to evaluate the connection if any between soda and sparkling water sales.

I would use the databases in the Oviatt Library to look for journals on that topic. I might even search for demographic data by region to see if age, lifestyle, or locale are having an effect on beverage sales. The opening paragraph demonstrates that the student not only understands the issue presented, but also that they have seen through the biased analysis of the rise in sparkling water sales presented in the article.

This writer has chosen to use their own knowledge, observations, and experience to question many of the claims made in the article by offering logical reasons for viewing the issue in other ways, and they use the outside example of tobacco use as an analogy to prove their point. The writer has addressed every question in the writing prompt by exploring the economic impact on lower socio-economic groups, by making use of the quantitative data in their analysis of the issue, and by describing how they would find additional reliable information on this topic, including key words and search strings.

Finally, they have developed their ideas thoroughly in each paragraph and demonstrated strong upper division level writing through the use of varied sentence structure, a sophisticated vocabulary, and a strong command of written English.

It is a superior response in timed-writing conditions. Marketing research firms, such as Euromonitor, have determined that consumption of sparkling water has increased Though this might at first appear to signal that sparkling water will outsell soda in the near future, it is important to look more closely.

Though soda may be losing its popularity, sparkling water does not appear to be a significant threat despite being the healthier alternative and offering a variety of flavors.

Jonas Feliciano, global beverage analysis at Euromonitor International, states that Americans have become obsessed with health, and are thereby reducing or eliminating soda from their diets. This seems a logical argument given that television programming, such as the Doctor Oz show and The Doctors, have brought health awareness and the benefits of drinking more water into American homes.

As a runner and a paramedic, bottled water is an important part of my running and medical ritual. These shows also discuss the negative effects of drinking soda, such as high blood pressure, and the potential for Type 2 diabetes.

Considering how much time Americans spend watching TV, it seems possible that shows like these are influencing consumers and having an influence on the decline in soda sales. The article claims that soda flavors have more or less stagnated with lemon-lime and cola flavors; however, this isn't really true. Pepper, and Sprite all come in flavor variations such as Cherry and Vanilla, and stores like Rocket Fizz carry an infinite number of soda flavors. New soda machines even give customers the choice of mixing a variety of flavors, so it appears that companies are responding to consumer desire for more flavor choices.

Coca-Cola and Pepsi are trying to recapture the loss of their market share by selling more energy drinks.

Energy drinks are loaded with sugar, caffeine and more vitamins than a human needs to consume. Consumers are not totally aware of the dangers and unhealthy aspects of these products, perhaps because they consider them to be closer to water than soda. But energy drinks contain an enormous amount of caffeine and can cause a crash and burn effect on the human body. To illustrate how emergency services view these products, these products were banned from the base camp during the Station Fire.


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Writing Proficiency Exam (WPE) English Placement; Fifteen Tips on Writing the WPE Essay. Read the short essay carefully, and be sure that you understand the task. Each short reading contains the vocabulary and terms that a college-educated student is expected to know and understand. The University Writing & Rhetoric Center offers.

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CPE Exam Tips (or How to Pass Proficiency) June 5, by Andrew Girardin. So you've nailed Advanced and now you're thinking of doing Proficiency? I get mails from lots of students in the same boat as you, all asking if I plan to do a website about CPE. This page is probably the most helpful for the exam in general and writing in.

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Page 1 of 3 Tips for passing the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam [email protected] [ updated: Friday, May 4, ] “Writing is thinking on paper.”. Preparing for the Writing Proficiency Exam (WPE) Reviewing the writing skills you have learned throughout your time in high school and college can help you prepare to succeed on the WPE. There are also a number of resources to help you with WPE preparation.

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Writing Proficiency Exam Hofstra's Writing Proficiency Exam is an essay exam intended to ensure that Hofstra students display competence as writers, regardless of their majors or the number of writing courses they have taken. Tips for Passing the Proficiency Exam. Preparing for the Writing Proficiency Exam To prepare for the Writing Proficiency Exam, consider the nature of the exam: it asks you to produce a persuasive, thesis-driven essay and use standard written American English.